In The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages, the family of main characters visits Trinity–the site of the first atomic explosion. Both parents have been working on the “gadget” as it was referred to (in the book and in real life), and the father had been present on July 16, 1945 for the test itself. […]

I don’t believe women lose their virginity. It implies they can find it again. Nor do I believe people lose their lives–“Whoops! Now where did I put my life…beneath a cushion on the couch? Maybe I left it on the kitchen counter…Honey, have you seen my life? I know I had it a minute ago.”  –The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church

There are some wonderful descriptions of New Mexico in The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church, although I was so captivated by the story that I hardly noticed them the first time around. The Taos Gorge is relatively narrow, darkly shadowed basalt, and so completely impassable that a 1950s-era car remains stranded amidst […]

There are no birds in The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages, but there is a lot to like. As a depiction of Los Alamos during the end stage development of the atomic bomb, it does surprisingly well. None of the characters can really talk about the project openly, but there is still the sense […]

Since the premises (at least on the surface) of The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages and The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church are similar, it was interesting to read them so close together and to take note of similarities and differences between the two. On the surface, both books have as […]

One of the things that made The Atomic Weight of Love come alive was Elizabeth J. Church’s use of music, books, movies, advertisements, and television to fully realize the time setting of the novel. In addition to the expected war news tidbits, numerous times Church refers to the release of a book or movie to […]

I was a bit torn in my reaction to the bird aspects of The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church. The author acknowledges that while she is a birder she is more interested in behavior than species identification and that certainly comes through in Meridian’s character as well. There are occasional comments about […]

The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church would be a fantastic book for a book club discussing feminist issues–I may have to post it as a suggestion to Emma Watson’s Our Shared Shelf. I was somewhat mislead by the descriptions into thinking there would be more about the development of the atomic bomb, […]