There are no birds in The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages, but there is a lot to like. As a depiction of Los Alamos during the end stage development of the atomic bomb, it does surprisingly well. None of the characters can really talk about the project openly, but there is still the sense […]

One of the things that made The Atomic Weight of Love come alive was Elizabeth J. Church’s use of music, books, movies, advertisements, and television to fully realize the time setting of the novel. In addition to the expected war news tidbits, numerous times Church refers to the release of a book or movie to […]

I was a bit torn in my reaction to the bird aspects of The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church. The author acknowledges that while she is a birder she is more interested in behavior than species identification and that certainly comes through in Meridian’s character as well. There are occasional comments about […]

The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church would be a fantastic book for a book club discussing feminist issues–I may have to post it as a suggestion to Emma Watson’s Our Shared Shelf. I was somewhat mislead by the descriptions into thinking there would be more about the development of the atomic bomb, […]

In To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey, one of the main characters, Sophie, discovers she is pregnant. She has mixed feelings when she learns of her pregnancy. She and her husband, Colonel Allen Forrester, are thrilled, however the doctor seems worried and refuses to give her any information other than telling […]

I like the novelty of a story told through letters, photos, journals, newspaper clippings, and other memorabilia. To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey (2016) is such a book, and it’s wonderfully done. It’s mostly centered in 1885, switching back and forth between the journals of Colonel Allen Forrester and his wife Sophie […]

In the Author’s Note, Cindy Dyson talks about which parts of And She Was were true to Aleutian history and which were fictionalized. We don’t know if any groups of women broke taboos to hunt sea mammals during the Russian-Aleut War. We do know that many starved. As a mother myself, I imagined what a […]